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TCS_Mythes

Electric Mobility: The 3 Great Myths

11. 12. 19.

Electric Mobility: The 3 Great Myths

Electric mobility is making progress, but this technology always faces strong prejudices.

According to a recent study, electric mobility in Switzerland is still too expensive, the autonomy of the vehicles is insufficient and the network of recharging stations is patchy. But these arguments have no basis, as the Swiss Touring Club (TCS) proves, together with Swiss eMobility, a Swiss association for electric mobility.
The barometer of electric mobility recently launched and published by the TCS has come up with the following finding: the majority of the Swiss population is certainly convinced that the future belongs to electric mobility, but continues to harbour serious reservations concerning this mode of propulsion. However, these are based on myths which, for a long time, no longer correspond to reality and often belong to an era where electric mobility still formed part of a niche market.

"Electric mobility is too expensive and is only for the rich"

According to the TCS electric mobility barometer, consumers are dissuaded mainly by the high purchase price of electric vehicles. The truth is that the difference in purchase price has significantly narrowed over the last few years, thanks mainly to the reduced cost of batteries and the growth in the number of electric vehicles. Result: the price has fallen sharply. Furthermore, thrifty drivers have realised that journeys using electricity are cheaper. If you consider the total costs for the operating life of the vehicle, an electric car can be cheaper than a vehicle fitted with a combustion engine as from 30,000 to 65,000 km, depending on the model chosen. This advantage will constantly improve in the years to come.

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"Autonomy is insufficient and there is a lack of public recharging stations"

The survey carried out for the TCS barometer highlighted another dissuading factor: the fear of an insufficient autonomy of electric cars and a lack of public recharging stations. This argument is also false. The average distance travelled by car per day is only 32 km, so even a small battery is easily sufficient. Daily journeys are therefore guaranteed by an electric car. Of course, long trips require a public recharging network, but this does in fact exist in Switzerland. An electric recharge must not be confused with full tank of fuel. In reality, electric cars are usually recharged during prolonged stops, so at home or at the workplace. The public recharging network must be regarded as a top-up because less than 20% of recharges are carried out on the road. 

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TCS_Mythes
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"Electric cars are not safe enough and catch fire easily"

Another widespread prejudice concerns safety. The TCS barometer revealed that fears concerning safety form a weighty argument against buying an electric vehicle. But the reality is simply the opposite: electric cars do not carry inflammable or explosive liquids. Scientific investigations have proved that electric cars catch fire less frequently than conventional cars. Lastly, the high weight of the underbody, which contains the batteries, reduces the risk of rolling over.

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Swiss eMobility has scotched many other myths regarding electric mobility. Well-based, easy to read arguments are available on www.swiss-emobility.ch. The TCS barometer on electric mobility can be found on www.tcs.ch.